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treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginaliz
.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site administrators to encourage them to get this
to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self regulation and other skills and specific focus and exciting working with them the past year and a half or so so i want people to have a look here, and what i would like to do is tie some of the things together that you have been hearing about today and in terms of bullying prevention, other prevention work going on in your state and in terms of promoting positive behaviors with youth, and so sometimes
that are kind of active in your life. so, i hope that this kind of education that will help people who are victims of violence, actually recognize that they are being exploited that they are in violent situations and it will give them the courage to kind of move out of those situation buzz but what i have found is people who are from the working class and are strained and unemployed, don't have the means to leave abusive situations. president chu made sure that more money goes into this and it is long overdue and so if the experience of me, the experience of the level of discourse around the issue of domestic violence has increased this past year, and then, that is a good thing. you know? and i am glad that more money and more attention is being given to this. i hope that in the future we see more women of color associated with this issue, today i don't see any. there are not any here, aliana lopez had a different perspective she was never brought into the conversation as somebody who was part of the conversation should never have bought into the conversation. and so hopefully, that o
by the san francisco board of education. we, in san francisco, have seen tremendous economic growth coming out of the most severe recession since the great depression, and having served on regional bodies that include other jurisdictions, i can tell you that we are very lucky in san francisco, that we are lucky that we have the resources that we have had, and that we hopefully will continue to have. but, yetd yet, in a city as wealthy as san francisco we have a school district that is facing a crisis. we have about half of our students in this class of 2014 that may not be able to graduate and meet the requirements. san francisco has to do better than that. and even though money is not everything, the ability for us to commit resources as a city is really important. and what i understand of this item is that there is a discussion about whether or not to tie the funding that's underlying this item to the rainy day fund. and to the extent that happens, to the extent that there is a connection between this appropriation and the rainy day fund, i will not support it. the rainy day fund was cre
be doing and creating jobs, making people have the opportunity to get them and trained and educated and placing them in the newest areas in our technology industry and when ron conway. ron just arrived and got out of at&t together. we worked together and had a personal agreement if we were as a city were to help technology we were going to have technology help us, so less than two years later when i first started the unemployment rate in san francisco was 9.6% and last friday we flipd that number in less than two years. [applause] lead my all the industries but most importantly by our technology industry. over 14,000, to 15,000 jobs were technology sector alone so it's right for us to make sure our future, our kids, our returning veterans, our people in their mid-career of their jobs now have an opportunity to really join in this job creating effort, and i still will say it's the private sector working with city government that's going to create the newest jobs for generations to come. today as part of the ongoing month of orange, month of innovation it's not only a celebration
bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i belie
justice and people say "that's san francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you ju
thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the attitudes don't change. so that is the human
and essentially in western soma right now education services are conditional use requirement and they have environmental review under way to convert that, to legalize to educational service. under the proposed zoning sli would become sally and in that district educational services are not proposed to be permitted any longer so that is potentially another project of another scale that could be impacted if there is no pipeline organd fathering provision so we want to talk about these in general. as i mentioned last week by in large it's not common to have it. market arcadia, recently balboa, and others didn't have pipeline or grandfathering provisions generally and we had a lot of projects held up by the process and the pdr issue that create what eastern neighborhood was, and i want to just -- yeah, talk about that a little bit, so under the asian neighborhoods pipeline -- because we don't have another example to grif you to base it off of it there were multiple types of pipeline projects to be categorized and whether residential or commercial or the date the application was filed. general
. joining me this morning is meg, the president of the national education association of virginia. we also have national nea representative dennis roikle with us as well. thank you for coming in so early this morning. >> good to be here. >> i want to start with you. overing picture, -- overarching picture, what is the big picture? what can we stand to lose because of the cliff? >> if nothing is double, it will be across the -- is done, it will be across the board cuts that translates into $4.8 billion. it will impact nine million kids, including 80,000 in head start. it will take a million dollars out of special education and we'll do awfully those cuts to kids and education so the wealthiest 2% of americans can have a tax cut. doesn't make sense. >> you're talking about spending on the federal level. you have to think about the money flowing through local coffers. fairfax county, the biggest school district in our region but a lot of people at home might be surprised that a quarter of kids are on reduced or free lunches. can they get by without those? >> they can't. when we look at the cu
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
they can continue to provide an education to these entitled, stupid, brats. anyway, you know who still hasn't been told about climate change? >> it is better he doesn't know. mr. bolton, uh par tied and fossil fuels, they are the same thing, right? >> yes. if they want to disinvest their endowment let them pay higher tuition or let their parents pay higher tuition. why stop there? if you don't like oil and gas companies why not the companies. divest from them too. and let's get to the center of the controversy. it is not just carbon-based fuels these people object to. they are carbon-based life forms. let's get to that next. >> and the life forms they disagree with are the ones they want to divest from. how will they go on spring break? when they are stoned out of their minds how are they going to get the pizza guy to get on his mow ped and come over and deliver the pizza without the use of fossil fuels. i never understand why they call them foss till fuels. i didn't know there were a lot of dead things underground, sandra, but then again i never went to school. you are a business person. g
in that process. >> 18 reasons was started almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that
services, education and employment, provides these opportunities for homeless people. we are already seeing the benefit of their work with us and it was at the outreach of tiffany and bill clark and the director of education and employment who is out of town with work related to the chef's program and through that contact i think we made a great start working with zen dusk and particularly on the chef's program and it was a great day to be here and mentioned earlier and their collaboration too and for us in the chef's program and the training culinary program those community relationships are essential. it doesn't work if you don't have it. we have relationships with about 20 restaurants in the city and we have now the benefit of this community benefits agreement with zen dusk with catering. i just talked before i came over here three times i think so far and we look at that only as the beginning. we also had the pleasure of doing a little teleconferencing at zen dusk offices and their equipment is a little more state of the art than ours and we appreciated that and i think for u
it as much as we do. so, i think full compliance is the goal. and to have education, to have free access assessment being done. and then to follow-up by those that are challenged economically, to have loans and to have grants that are made available to have all of them participate in this program is incredibly good for the city. and i think it will help many of the small businesses understand their obligations to respond to these better, but also help them get into compliance better. so, i'm glad to launch this program here on irving street with supervisor chu who has been a really big champion for this. but we have many members of our business community that have also been asking us to do something positive about this. and not let these small businesses become victimized in these drive-by lawsuits. to do what we can to make it a positive thing. so, i'm so glad that joaquin has come aboard to help us. he, having headed up the neighborhood services program for years, now has his talent with todd in making sure that all of the small businesses along these commercial corridors have access t
justice -- getting education is a social justice issue. we don't want kids to feel they can't go to school or go home. we want other's worth intact and appreciate the worth. justice is a public face of love and 60% of kids who are discipline read likely to drop out of school, so if we attach the same concerns that we have for all of the students and comparing with the evidence base data that suggests there are a lairming rates of suspensions and explullions and how does that push the conversation or do other things that we are innovative with and coming up with real solutions? not just to bullying but all of the social factors that affect students and adults and there are several adults that need training as well. that's my point. >> yeah. actually the work place bullying institute which has good data i am told and found that 35% of american employees say that they have been bullied in the work place. that is about double over the figure for kids so this is not a kid problem, but so are you asking if there should be programs and campaigns aimed at minority students as a diffe
in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. ♪ don't know what i'd do ♪ i'd have nothing to prove ♪ i'd have nothing to lose [ male announcer ] zales is the diamond store. take an extra 10 percent off storewide, now through sunday. wears off. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. >>> our constitution and our statutes are extremely explicit and specific about the power to print money.ç this is not surprising, because, well, it's a very important power. and so you cannot print money and i cannot print money, and mitt romney, even though it seems like he used to when he worked at bain capital, he cannot print money. no, only the federal reserve can print paper money and the secretary of the treasury can mint coins. not just any coins, there are a number of restrictions. for example, the width of the dollar coin,
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want our taxes to go to serve the policies of the country, education, charity, health care. i think that president obama's right about this. but i think compromise is going to be necessary to achieve some result. >> let me bring in abbe. your father is known as a moderate republican and a good dealmaker, a man who used to negotiate. what do you make of this? and what does he make of this? >> i think morale is so low right now. the country's so divided. especially for my generation. we're the ones that are going to be handed down the $60 trillion defic deficit. they will come to a deal. but right now, it's political theater. and it's probably going to look like the simpson-bowles. that will come full-circle again. >> here's a problem the republicans have got themselves into. is obama has been very clever here, the president. i think what he's done is skillfully said to the public, if he goes over the fiscal cliff, the republicans are prepared to make the entire middle class to pay more tax to save 2% of the wealthiest americans paying a little bit more. and that's a very bad position
and inventor and onetime presidential candidate himself believed that the best education should be ax ses i believe to anyone that qualified to get in. anyone including women and people of color. the question of whether a student can pay for tuition, he thought that should be irrelevant. for more than a century now every student has received a full tuition scholarship at one of the best colleges of the country. that's the mission and history of the cooper union. in its more recent history, school administrators announced to chip away at the policy. they will begin charging tuition for gradual students starting this school year. undergrads are safe for now but maybe later they will have admissions too. they searched for a way out of what it described as a deepening financial hole. despite the recent financial crisis, thousand, the cooper union has maintained $600 million endowment. it owns the land beneath the chrysler building, but the school says it's operating at a loss and the shortfall has to come from somewhere, including from the students. never mind what the school's founder and name
of money and use that money for education and other things. >> all right. thank you for that. clearly so many more questions, legal questions, and for that we'll skip over to our joey jackson, legal commentator who joins us live from atlanta now. i think one of the big questions that also still remains for all of those guys out there having all sorts of fun in the park, there is still a federal law that says you can't smoke it. you can't carry it. you can't buy it. you can't sell it. you can't do anything when it comes to dope and the feds. how are these two entities going to compromise in this respect? >> with great difficulty. that was some party they had there. the federal law is pretty significant here because of course as you know back in 1970 we had a controlled substance act under nixon and one of those drugs that the fed said, you know what, was illegal and as you mentioned you can't manufacture and you can't produce and you can't import and you can't distribute and you can't sell would be marijuana and that's problematic because you have something called the supremacy clause. it
bullying is happening at an alarming rate in higher education. i'm joined now by the book's author, dr. leah hollis. you say 62% of people who work in higher education have experienced bullying versus 45% of the general population. where did you get these numbers? >> i survived 175 schools and found a number of people especially in entry levels and middle management were talking about how they were the target of bullying from the boss or organization in general. >> what's going on, why at colleges and universities? how are bullies protected? >> what's interesting is in a college or university we are trained tore experts in our field to go -- to be experts in our field to go out and increase knowledge. it's also an isolating experience. so now when you have two managed people or collaborators have team be, you've already been protected by tenure and at least in a culture that supports being isolated and supports a big ego. that doesn't always make for the best situations. >> who are saying they're being bullied, younger educator by tenured folks? >> the assistant director or the manager
also 7:00. >> john hopkins is a world-class institution. >> up next how this educational plans to help its neighbors. >> ben roethlisberger will or won't he sign. as the steelers chase the ravens coming up in sports. >> we see wet weather coming in from the west. we'll check out that out in the seven-day forecast. >> a cash infusion from the neighbors around john hopkins university. $10 million, the money is from the school to help fund projects, projects that will be chosen by the neighbors themselves. it is to promote and buying more from local businesses. the announcement was made today. >> it has become clear that the interest of our neighbors, safe streets, the elimination of dilapidated properties, and the work force are also the interest of our university. after all, the future of john hopkins is linked to that of the community and we're deeply, deeply, and purposefully committed to baltimore's success. >> there is 10 neighboring communities that surround the cam pass that qualify to receive some of the money. >> it looks like we timed the weather perfectly for the lighting of t
and when the police come the first time it's not the first time it happened and people need to be educated about that and the women were behind that when i was in the office. next item. >> next item is san francisco response to domestic violence violence and comprehensive report on domestic violence and we have the chairs here and i want to say how impressive this whole organization is because we have very much a coordinated response to domestic violence and law enforcement, the social workers, caseworkers, -- >> president soo if i might you need to take a vote on the consent calendar. >> i'm sorry. can we have a motion to approve the consent agenda? >> so moved. >> second. >> all in favor? >> aye. >> i apologize. thank you. so with the family violence council in the last year we've seen a child abuse intervention and prevention program and we were mandated and not every county has it and beverly pointed that out and alisa worked for the last six months and a year in the making to have a phone app in response to elder abuse and you push a button and brings up the resources and with th
cannot go to school. i think malala will become the symbol of a girl's rights to education. >> well said. i couple of contemporary issues, one here and one back in our homeland. first one is the fiscal cliff. you're one of the keener economic minds in great britain. what do you make of what's happening in america? the old expression if america sneezes, we all catch a cold back in europe, as true as ever. what do you think should be happening here to try and get a deal to avoid the fiscal cliff happening? >> i have no doubt people are working very hard to get a deal. i wish their discussions -- well, now we have the president re-elected and we have a new congress. i think it's right they get them to the business of sorting this out. i think america's got to think that what it needs to do is get growth in its economy as well. and it needs to get growth by trade and exporting. i think what we're missing at the moment is a global agreement whereby big powers try to rebuild confidence in the world. yes, have you to sort out the fiscal problems. yes, you also have to have growth because that's
the stimulus package to wealthy bankers. $50 billion went to education services of stimulus. $35 billion to increase education. there is $250 billion that went toward programs they represent. >> bob: i see. healthcare extension -- >> eric: point the finger at yourself. urination? urinating on poor people, that is disgusting, wrong, rude. they should be -- you know what? pull the funding. pull all of their funding. >> bob: they fund themselves. you want to pull the funding, pull the rich people from the i.r.s. >> greg: what i love about this, in the video or the cartoon they show a state declining in the poverty. it's not caused by the rich, because rich are leaving. >> dana: last week in forbes.com there was ten or 11 death spiral states. you don't want a house and can't get a job and ones saddled with the pension debt from the public sector unions. we had a big fight in wisconsin over this. what we were we dealing with at the start of school? chicago teachers union when school was starting. what happened to schoolhouse rock? those were video where you could learn something. >> greg: you
and higher education? because they know if they want to get ahead, they've got to embrace that diversity. if they want to continue to be a fortunes 50 company, there's got to embrace diversity. similarly if we want to get down to the local level and address this issue, we've got to teach our kids that the sooner that you embrace difference and understand that your muslim classmate or your seat classmate or your gay classmate or your limited english professor classmate might be tomorrow's ceo or today's best friend of yours, the better off we will be. you have a leg up, having done about 30 jury trials across this country and seen interactions between people of diverse backgrounds. >> and here we try to celebrate, not just embrace, our diversity. celebrate all our interesting diversity but also celebrate the things that bind us together. ruslyn, does can urriculum need to change or is that not yet where you are. >> the federal government can't -- 10th amendment. >> change it. >> that would be federal overreach. >> well stated. >> no, but, but, so we are not funding or digging into can
. and talk with your children and teens about the subject and get educated on the subject yourself so you can learn how it handle it and really talk to your children about it can be fun, it can be dangerous, these new toys that we have. >> wow. all right, i'd like to introduce the members of our panel today, rob is here, rob, could you come on up, rob neighbor, please join us. thank you so much for being here. (applause). >> assembly tom ammiano is here. (applause). >> and our state school chief tom torlichman is here and he is making his way to the podium. thank you all for being here. rob, i want to start with you. you are a los gatos man. how old was jill when this started happening. >> it started happening when jill was about 14, it started in december, she turned 15 in february and then less than a month later, she passed. >> i can't even imagine what that was like for you all. you have another daughter so you just couldn't fold so how did you deal with all that? >> that's one of the greatest challenges. you know, the devastation that jill went through, the pain, doesn't stop. famili
educational experiences. we have a good plan for how this is going to be used. i think it's a worthy plan, worthy services for youth that desperately need greater opportunity in life. i will be supporting this when it comes forward but there are so many intangibles that the school district provides us as a city that cannot be counted in any way. >> president chiu: supervisor kim. >> supervisor kim: i'll try to keep my comments brief. i want to say i find this conversation incredibly exciting and i'm glad we as a board are talking about what it needs to have a true city-school partnership. i think it's important for us as a city to have a discussion about what it costs to run schools. i had the opportunity to sit on the first citizens advisory committee when prop h was created in march of 2004. you know, we fully funded prop h as the voters had asked us in its first three years that we've released funds to the school district. unfortunately in the last five years we have pulled the trigger which allows us to cut what we give to the district by 25%. over the last five years that means the c
college education, and it was at that time that howard became a labor activist. howard moved to san francisco in 1967, with his lover, roger. he continued to work in the antiwar movement as a organizer in opposition to the vietnam war and staff organizer for the national peace coalition. his efforts and those of other progressive activists to bring into the movement -- to bring labor into the movement were very successful when the northern california labor councils were the first to actually oppose the vietnam war. with the rise of an organized movement in the gay community in the early 1970's, howard founded the bay area gay liberation inkn 1975, which was to advance lgbt rights here in san francisco. the organization's life was actions for lgbt rights and dramatically increased the san francisco. during that period he formed the committee to defend gays in the military. this was back in the mid-1970's. and he began his work on the boycott in 1975. of course those of us who know a little bit about harvey milk know a little bit about his involvement in that boycott. as howard explai
's educational about this facility. >> fire fly by artist ned con is an art installation which rises straight from the golden gate avenue sidewalk to the top of the building. >> the fire fly wall will be 5 by 5 polley carbon plates that will move with the wind and show a wave effect in the daytime. when those also swing back and forth and they hit the fulcrum, it will also set up an led light that will cover the fire fly. so, at nighttime people in another part of san francisco can see the side of our building and about 20 feet wide and 10 stories high will be a wall that will flickr on and off like fire flies at nighttime. it will be so energy efficient that if all those lights go on, it will be the equivalent of a 40 watt bulb. and also the new piece of artwork going all the way down the side of the building, which looks like this incredible wind ripples on a pond. and i thought, oh, my god, how incredible, how wonderful. >> inside the building we will have water walls in the main staircase, and the water will be dripping through the side of the wall. you'll be able to hear it, you'll be ab
's what i was. i mean, i had a little education along the way, i hope i learned something in the process. but i never expected to be asked to serve on the supreme court. i was very honored. i wasn't sure i should do it. i had never argued a case at the core, i had not been a law clerk at the court. >> did the president himself call you? >> he did. my phone wrong and it was ronald reagan an the phone. he said, sandra, i'd like to announce your nomination for the court tomorrow. frank lie my heart sang. >> really? >> it really did. because i was not at all sure that i could do the job well enough. i didn't know if i could. i told my husband and he said, oh, that's ridiculous, of course you can. and he was more certain and enthused than i was. >> then you came to washington and -- >> did i. >> do you think they treated you differently because you were a woman? >> well, they were very curious to meet me. those who didn't know me. number one, they were curious. number two, they weren't sure and number three, women are half of our voting population, aren't they? i think there was a certain hes
way. you wll have a way to educate kids. third, we have to be able to deliver an adequate lel of services for taxpayers and taxes paid. so that we can create an environment for businesses to create jobs. gerri: long-term talks about this. a long way to go. i wish would come he would come back and maybe we will have a conversation. i really appreciate yo coming on the show,hank you so much and i think you for having me. gerri: now we want to know what you think. banda gerriwillis.com, vote on the right-nd side of the screen. we have lots more in the show. twenty-six days until we fall off the fiscal cliff. is that what democrats want us to do? pictures seem so. we go live to capitol hill in 10 minutes. while ngress talked about wanting to cut excess spending, the nbers may tell a different story. i will break it down coming up next. you stl think you're colder than me? nah. don tell me. tell tiny! [ ice crackling ] [ knuckles cracking ] and who are you supposed to be, back-up? handle it. what you looking at? ha! cat-like reflexes... whoa! [ male announcer ] the coors light silv
... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> the fascination with taxes i paid i find to be very small-minlded compared to the broad issues that we face, but i did go back and look at my taxes. over the past ten years i never paid less than 13%. i think the most recent year is 13.6% or something like that. >> 13%. you know who would hate that? you know who would hate that mitt romney paid only 13% in income taxes? the guy who beat mitt romney's father in the campaign for president in 1968, right wing reactionary richard nixon. that's right. republican richard nixon who was as conservative as republicans got in those days hated the idea that rich people got away with paying little or no income taxes. he introduced a bill that would create a minimum tax that rich people would have to pay even if they had the giant package of deductions and loopholes like romney that got their tax liability down to zero. they had to pay something. the nixon idea w
owned by the career education corporation, one of the major league for-profit colleges. his parents didn't have the means to pay for his education but helped him out by cosigning the loans. now the student and the parents have $103,000 in student loan debt. one of the loans has a 13% interest rate, and the balance continues to rise. this young man, young man would like to finish his degree but he can't afford to. he can't borrow any more money. he is too deeply in debt. how about that for a dilemma? $103,000 in debt, no degree. he can't borrow the money to get a degree. many of these students find out these for-profit courses they took are worthless. they don't transfer anywhere. the diplomacy themselves turn out to be worthless and many employers just laugh at them. you would never know that from the advertising these for-profit schools engage in. i had a group of students in my office this morning. they were from archbishop carroll high school, not too far from the capitol here. they are students who know a little bit about being wooed and enticed by colleges, universities. we talked a
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